I want to express my deep concern about climate change in Pakistan and how it is affecting millions of poor people. Climate change has put a lot of countries at hazard, and the risk is significantly larger for developing countries. Because of this serious problem, which is having a severe impact on the area, South Asia has grown more disaster-prone. In general, climate change is accelerating and having severe consequences for Pakistan.

So far, the floods have affected over 33 million people. Over 110 districts have been declared calamity hit, with severe flooding threatening Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. There have been 1,033 deaths and 949,858 people have been displaced. The actual figures are expected to be significantly higher. More devastation is expected in the coming days, which could be unprecedentedly severe. According to the State Disaster Management Authority, around 2 million acres of crops and orchards have also been affected, with at least 304,000 acres in Balochistan, 178,000 acres in Punjab, and 1.54 million acres in Sindh affected. Damage to infrastructure has exacerbated the humanitarian situation, as the partial or complete destruction of over 3,000 km of roads and 145 bridges impede people’s ability to flee to safer areas or travel to markets, healthcare, or other vital services, and limits aid delivery to those in need.

Depending on the severity, flood victims have lost everything they have: their homes, their jobs, and even their loved ones. Whether it’s donating a rupee or volunteering to rebuild damaged houses, there are several ways to lend a helping hand to those in need. Be sure that you are donating to reputable organisations like Edhi, and many more. Unfortunately, some shameful organisations can crop up in the aftermath of disasters as ploys to steal well-intentioned donations. A recent trend among aid organisations is to provide a phone number and keyword for people to make a donation. The amount you give will show up on your next mobile phone bill. All donations to this fund will support recovery and relief efforts for flooding and monsoons in Pakistan.

AYESHA KHAN,

Lahore.