A drought has officially been declared in southwestern Wales on Friday amid rising temperatures and dry weather conditions.

A hosepipe ban, the first in 30 years, has been imposed in two regions of the country as it has experienced less-than-average rainfall.

"We have decided to declare a state of drought in south-west Wales after it was clear the lack of rain and recent heat have put a huge strain on our rivers, reservoirs and groundwater levels," said Natalie Hall of Natural Resources Wales (NRW).

"It can impact some of our most precious habitats and species as well as systems we often take for granted, such as our water supplies," she added.

According to NRW, southwestern wales met the criteria of an official drought on Friday after it experienced its driest five months between March and July in 40 years.

Under the hosepipe ban, residents are restricted from watering their gardens, filling up swimming pools and ponds, and washing their cars.

"While certain parts of Wales may be experiencing rain, it can still take a long time to recover from drought, making water a precious resource," Hall said.

Last week, an official drought was declared in eight areas of England with a number of hosepipe bans being enforced throughout the country.

This year, the UK has experienced its hottest and driest summer, with the months of July and August seeing two heat waves and recording temperatures between 35-40 C (95-104 F).