Germany, Egypt, France, and Jordan voiced their commitment on Saturday to a two-state solution between Israel and Palestine for lasting peace in the Middle East.

Following a meeting of these countries' foreign ministers in Munich, a joint statement said the they "continue their coordination and consultation with a view to advancing the Middle East peace process towards a just, comprehensive and lasting peace on the basis of the two-state solution."

Expressing concern about increasing tensions on the ground, they said that "against this backdrop, we recall the urgency of the resumption of serious, meaningful and effective talks directly between the parties or under a UN umbrella, including under the Middle East Quartet."

They also underlined the importance of creating political and economic horizons in the absence of negotiations.

"In that regard, we would like to see further mutual confidence-building measures based on reciprocal commitments, with a view to improving living conditions of the Palestinian people and restoring meaningful negotiations."

They also called for an end to all unilateral measures that undermine the two-state solution and lasting peace, including "the building and expansion of settlements, the confiscation of land and the eviction of Palestinians from their homes, including in East Jerusalem, as well as any acts of violence and incitement."

"In this context, we stress that the rights of the residents of Sheikh Jarrah and Silwan neighborhoods with regard to their homes must be respected," they said.

They went on to reiterate the importance of upholding the historic and legal status quo of the holy sites in Jerusalem.

"We emphasize the importance of all peace treaties between Arab states and Israel contributing to the resolution of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict on the basis of the two-state solution so that comprehensive and lasting peace is achieved," they concluded.

After Egypt and Jordan, the UAE and Israel signed a US-sponsored deal in September 2020 to normalize their relations. Since then, the two countries exchanged official visits by senior officials and have signed dozens of bilateral agreements in various fields, including investment, banking services, and tourism.

Three other Arab states -- Bahrain, Morocco, and Sudan -- joined the UAE in the controversial move that came to be known as the Abraham Accords.

The normalization deals have since drawn widespread condemnations from Palestinians, who say the accords ignore their rights and do not serve the Palestinian cause.