Dr James J Zogby

  • Several economic, social, and political issues are important to the November midterm elections, but fundamentally the elections are about which party and candidate voters feel cares most about them and have solutions that address their most basic needs. Considering this, shockwaves should have gone ...

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  • Here’s a story I’ve never told before:I travelled to Tunisia in late 1993 to meet with PLO Chairman Yasir Arafat. I was serving as co-chair of Builders for Peace, a project launched by then Vice President Al Gore to help create employment and promote economic growth in the Occupied ...

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  • I’ve been on vacation for the past two weeks. Unlike previous years, this time I cut myself off from work. During the past few days, I’ve been catching up, reading two weeks of news about depressingly familiar developments unfolding (or not) in Lebanon, Syria, Palestine/Israel, and ...

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  • On a US Embassy-sponsored speaking tour in Yemen before its 1993 national elections, I met with the leaders of various political parties and heard complaints about the ruling party’s repressive and anti-democratic behaviours. Some were serious human rights violations; others were seemingly petty ...

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  • In 2020, I published “Arab Voices: What They Are Saying to Us and Why It Matters.” Based on our polling during the first decade of this new century, “Arab Voices” was an effort to lay out the myths that have shaped Western discourse about the Arab World, understand why those myths have ...

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  • When Congress passed 2002’s bipartisan McCain-Feingold bill on campaign finance reform, many hoped for a new era in US politics. It set limits on individual and political action committees’ contributions and required that all contributions in federal elections be reported to the Federal ...

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  • Fifty years ago this past July, Israel assassinated Ghassan Kanafani—by planting a bomb in his car killing him and his 17-year-old niece. Over the years I’ve thought a lot about Ghassan, his contributions to Arab literature, and the role he played in shaping my doctoral dissertation and my ...

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  • The Biden administration’s approach and media coverage given to the president’s visits to Israel/Palestine and Saudi Arabia were starkly contradictory. Biden gushed with the Israelis, but was vague with the Palestinians, and so cautious with Gulf Arab leaders that he almost undercut his ...

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  • President Biden’s upcom­ing visit to Saudi Arabia has provoked a rash of harsh commentary. While it’s appro­priate for writers to air pol­icy differences with the Kingdom, the tone and content of comments and political cartoons about Saudi Arabia are filling the press with rac­ist diatribe ...

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  • Maya Berry, executive director of the Arab American Institute, was in the Middle East earlier this month with her children. In the region for work-related meetings, she had taken them to her ancestral home in Lebanon. With a free day in Jordan, Maya planned a 24-hour visit to the West Bank and ...

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  • Though the January 6 congressional hearings may be important for historical record, detailing the facts behind the insurrection that attempted to violently overturn the 2020 election, it may also be an exercise in futility.First, we already know the essentials of what happened that day and former ...

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  • Last week, Mary Lou McDonald, the President of the Irish republican/socialist party, and leader of the opposition in the Irish Parliament, addressed a European Union conference. When asked how she would direct Irish foreign policy, her remarks were compelling and instructive. She began by noting: ...

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  • While the GOP’s internal battle revolves around Trump and Trumpism, the conflict playing out among Democrats is between moderates and progressives and comes in two distinct forms. The first is between candidates seeking to broaden the party’s appeal beyond its “base,” and those who believe ...

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  • It’s difficult to find the words that adequately describe our feelings on first learning of the massacre of 19 children and two teachers in Texas last week. Shock, fear, even nausea, and then disgust at the realisation that this nightmare was playing out again. The next day’s papers were filled ...

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  • In addition to the predictable battles that will take place between the Republican and Democratic parties, this year’s US primary election contests are featuring significant struggles being waged within both parties. On the Republican side, the internal conflicts are not ideological. With few ...

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  • The killing of Shireen Abu Akleh left me furious: a wonderful woman journalist is gone; Israel’s response is predictable; and the US has failed to take a principled stand for truth and accountability. Shireen, an American citizen and journalist who for the past 25 years has been reporting from ...

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  • The killing of Shireen Abu Akleh left me furious: a wonderful woman journalist is gone; the Israel state’s response is predictable; and the US has failed to take a principled stand for truth and accountability.  Shireen, an American citizen and journalist who for the past 25 years has been ...

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  • Significant realignments are taking place across the globe. Old alliances appear to be experiencing stress or outright fractures, while new ones are emerging. Media commentary on these developments too often takes a microscopic view, focusing on individual conflicts or shifting alliances without ...

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  • A terrible and tragic drama is playing out across Israel/Palestine—a dance of death with Israelis and Palestinians each engaged in their own form of destructive violence. If we should have learned anything from this conflict, it is that just as Palestinian violence has not ended the Israeli ...

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  • April is Arab American Heritage Month. It may not be a big deal to some, but for those of my generation this recognition represents a half century of struggle to overcome outright bigotry, political exclusion, and ignorance about who we are, our history, and our contributions to American life. ...

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  • Mask mandates have ended in all 50 states and people are re-emerging. Downtown Washington feels alive once more. Restaurants are filling up, and rush hour is again a nightmare. But caution is still in order. Last summer some thought that the pandemic had receded; a relieved public began to act ...

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  • My first dealings with Madeleine Albright were at the 1988 Democratic Convention. I was representing the presidential campaign of Rev. Jesse Jackson, while she represented the Democratic nominee, Michael Dukakis.The nominee’s team had written rather stale platform language about the ...

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  • The double standards in political commentary regarding the war in Ukraine have been widely discussed—from the welcoming of Ukrainian refugees (while Arab refugees face closed doors), to the support of Ukrainians’ right to self-determination and resistance to invasion (while these are denied to ...

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  • At the end of February, my BlackBerry Curve died. It didn’t actually die, but it might as well be dead, because my BlackBerry only operates on 3G and my phone provider has ended 3G service. As a result, my device turns on and I can still type on it, but because it can’t connect, what I type ...

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  • The battle brewing among some US liberals in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine recalls debates that occurred in the aftermath of Saddam Hussein’s invasion and occupation of Kuwait.Back then, instead of focusing on Kuwait, some of my colleagues, angered by the immediate support the US ...

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  • Putin’s Russia played “chicken” with the West and, and it appears that he has won. Unlike many on the Democratic left, I believed, early on, that NATO should have sent troops to Ukraine clearly demonstrating that they wouldn’t tolerate any threat to its sovereignty even if it were not a ...

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  • Our Muslim brothers in Bangladesh who were once East Pakistan are debt free. Most people live within their means, under tin roofs and use cycle rickshaws for transport. The country has emerged as a major exporter of garments with foreign exchange reserves almost twice that of the Islamic Republic ...

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  • When it comes to the Palestine Liberation Organisation, there’s good news and bad news. The bad news is that the PLO is near dead. The good news is that the Palestinian people’s quest for national self-determination remains very much alive and well. The PLO was created to embody the Palestinian ...

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  • Every year during Black History Month in the United States, I recall a televised interview with Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier I watched over a half century ago. Discussing the importance of teaching Black history, they noted that its explicit teaching was necessary if our goal is to tell the ...

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  • This past month presented two examples of how Israel deals with criticism and how dodging challenges to its abusive behaviours has become increasingly difficult.Example 1. On January 12, Omar Abdulmajeed Assad, a 78-year-old Palestinian American, died at the hands of the Israeli occupation forces. ...

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